Clearance has been granted for the Samsung Galaxy Watch series to monitor blood pressure

The ability of Samsung’s Galaxy Watch series to measure blood pressure from the wrist has been given the go-ahead by South Korea’s Ministry of Food and Drug Safety (MFDS). In order to make use of the capability, you will need to calibrate the first reading using a conventional blood pressure monitor.

The firm once provided users with a blood pressure monitoring tool that was experimental. It was enabled in a few nations at the beginning of the previous year and was carried out by means of a study app for smartphones that was created in collaboration with the University of California, San Francisco.

It’s huge news that the Samsung Health Monitor app has been given the go-ahead by the Medical Device and Diagnostics Society (MFDS). Because of this, the technology developed by Samsung is the first of its kind to be able to detect blood pressure without the need for a cuff.

The Japanese medical technology firm Omron introduced HeartGuide in the previous year. Additionally, it operates from the wrist. The HeardGuide, on the other hand, is a sphygmomanometer that is the size of a watch. This indicates that it contains a small cuff that is incorporated into the band of the watch and that it may inflate in order to monitor blood pressure.

You are going to have to calibrate the app before you can really use it. This can be accomplished by measuring the user’s blood pressure using both the watch and a conventional blood pressure monitor. It is recommended by Samsung that you continue practising this activity once a month to guarantee accuracy. The readings may be taken with any watch in the Galaxy Watch line. However, the software will initially only be compatible with the Galaxy Watch Active 2 device.

This is probably due to the fact that this watch includes the most up-to-date optical heart-rate sensor integrated right in. Analysis of pulse waves is how the capability is put to use. A single reading takes around twenty to thirty seconds to complete. Users are instructed to completely cover the sensor with their index finger at all times. Both the app and the watch will show a progress indicator, and after it is finished, you will get a notice that the task has been finished.

According to Taejong Jay Yang, Corporate SVP and Head of Health Team for Mobile Communications Business at Samsung Electronics, “The Samsung Health Monitor app has the potential to help millions of people around the world who are affected by high blood pressure.” 

“This is just one of many instances that demonstrate how Samsung is blending the best-in-class hardware that it has to offer with the most recent software advances in order to reinvent mobile experiences.”

Even though the Samsung Health Monitor app is not yet complete, it has still been granted approval as a piece of software that may be used as a medical device. In the third quarter of 2020, it is anticipated that the app will eventually be made accessible to everyone.

Leave a Reply