Gas in Infant Stomach: How to Prevent and Relieve Gas in a Baby

Gas in Infant Stomach: How to Prevent and Relieve Gas in a Baby

During the first months of life, it is very common for babies to have gas, which in many cases generates situations of stress, anxiety, crying. Do you know what they are and how to handle them? In my installment today I tell you everything you need to know about this topic.

Let’s get started!  Gases are the result of the metabolism process of digested food. They can also be generated during the feeding of babies who eat too quickly or anxiously or with an inadequate breastfeeding technique, for example, when both the mother and the baby are lying down (horizontal position).

HOW TO KNOW WHEN THE BABY HAS GAS?

Being a parent is a process of learning and recognition. In this case, the baby tends to feel tense, stops feeding, makes a “can’t find me” face, and his tummy feels hard.

Gas can also be accompanied by reflux due to immaturity in closing the stomach’s doorway to the rest of your digestive system. Milk is returned from the stomach into the esophagus, pharynx, larynx, mouth, and may even regurgitate through the nose. In addition, this milk has been in contact with saliva and stomach acids, so it will irritate the entire pathway through which it passes, so the baby could strain when he wants to clear his throat , throw his head back and make faces the burning you feel in the pit of your stomach. You could also have a cough, dysphonia or otitis depending on the severity of the reflux.

WHY IS YOUR BABY GASSY?

This could happen because of the poor feeding and gas extraction technique; the baby must be vertical to avoid the generation of gases and facilitate the exit of these. It is important that you bear in mind that, if after three to four weeks of the correction of the feeding technique the baby does not improve or shows warning signs, other causes should be considered and ruled out.

Why Is My Baby Gassy?

WHAT ARE THE RED FLAGS?

Persistent vomiting, poor weight gain, inconsolable crying, bloody stools, baby turns purple and shows signs of respiratory distress.

HOW TO DIFFERENTIATE COLIC FROM GAS?

Many parents tend to confuse gas with colic, but they are different situations. Crying from colic occurs after the baby’s second week of life , is inconsolable, can last from 1 to 3 hours for more than 3 days a week, predominates in the afternoon and early evening. It generally subsides spontaneously in the third month.

Colic occurs more frequently in boys than in girls, in children of highly emotionally charged mothers, and both in babies fed to the breast and with infant formulas (1).

HOW TO TREAT GAS IN YOUR BABY?

Stay calm and enjoy breastfeeding. The most important thing is that you are relaxed  and that you make the baby feel that ‘everything is fine’, as the Kid would say.  The best technique to remove gas is by placing the baby sitting on your lap or leaning on your chest, with his back straight and his head in neutral. Always watching your face and without compressing your stomach.

A caring home environment and good eating technique are vital. Pharmacological management is unlikely to be helpful. Also, these drugs can have adverse effects. My advice to you: be patient and enjoy this new stage. Remember, it is essential to have good eating habits, education, empowerment and tranquility.

The above content from Collaborative Research Group is for educational and informational purposes only and has been developed by following reliable medical sources and recommendations from health experts. If you feel identified with any symptoms, described medical term or you are a patient,  we recommend you consult your doctor. 

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