Oculus Move is a virtual reality fitness tracker that is compatible with Oculus Quest

Oculus plans to produce a virtual reality (VR) fitness tracker by the end of this year. This tracker will be compatible with Oculus’s Quest virtual reality headset. It will be known as Oculus Move, and it will be capable of tracking movement, the number of calories burned, and other data across a wide range of virtual reality applications.

Mark Zuckerberg divulged this knowledge to those in attendance at the Facebook Connect keynote event earlier this week. After the Quest 2 trailer was released, the announcement came out almost shortly after it. It is reasonable to suppose that the function will benefit those who prefer to maintain an active lifestyle while playing video games. [C]onsumers who want to keep their bodies moving while playing video games. If I’m being frank with you, most of us are to blame for not getting enough exercise.

Oculus Move is a virtual reality headgear that monitors the amount of time spent moving, the number of calories burned, and the intensity of exercise while the user is playing a range of games while wearing the headset. Users are able to not only keep a record of their past workouts using the Occulus Move dashboard, but they can also set personal goals for themselves to strive toward.

The procedure that will be followed to obtain the data hasn’t been made quite apparent. The headgear on its own is probably going to be the most reliable method. We believe it is doubtful that Facebook would create a fitness tracker that operates on its own. Still, the firm may offer the capability to sync other wearables such as Fitbits, Garmins, or Apple Watches. In any case, whenever the service is eventually made available to the public at the end of this year, everything will be brought out into the open.

The YUR.watch is likely to have some competition from the Occulus Move. This one, which was made available earlier this year, is worn on the user’s virtual reality wrist, and from there, it spits out statistics such as a calorie counter, estimated heart rate (which is derived via machine learning based on the user’s height and weight), current activity level, and more. You might even link it to a chest strap that measures your heart rate while you are actually moving about in the real world.

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