Review of the cost-effective Fitbit Inspire HR, which excels at the fundamentals

PROS

  • Slim and lightweight design
  • dependable fitness monitoring
  • Detailed data on sleep
  • Battery life of 5 days is reasonably priced.

CONS

  • A hefty bezel
  • no altimeter
  • No integrated GPS.

Rating

Easy to use : 7.0/10 

Design : 7.0/10 

Use of information: 7.0/10 

Motivation: 7.0/10 7.0/10

The newest addition to Fitbit’s line of wearables is the Inspire HR. It unites the company’s fitness tracker range together with its younger, lower-spec sister, Inspire. The Alta HR, Alta, Flex 2, and other earlier Zip and One trackers are no longer necessary thanks to these gadgets. While supplies last, you can still purchase them.

Inspire HR combines the best features of its predecessors into a sleek and elegant package. The activity band first debuted at the beginning of this year, but up until a few months ago, it was only accessible to Fitbit’s corporate, wellness, health plan, and health systems partners’ customers, participants, and members.

It’s time for our comprehensive evaluation now that it’s out there and accessible to everyone. Here is our interpretation of the Inspire HR.

Design

The new Fitbit fitness bracelet looks quite similar to its predecessors. It does, however, adopt a more contemporary, curved design with rounded edges. You won’t even notice it on your wrist because it weighs just 20 grams. In order to fit the battery, it is also somewhat thick but also quite narrow.

The small display is a cost associated with the thin form-factor. The black and white 37 x 16 mm OLED touchscreen that comes with the Inspire HR provides decent visibility both inside and outside. When not in use, it shuts off to conserve battery life. It will come to life if you lift your wrist or tap the face. Everything about Fitbit is relatively standard.

Review of the cost-effective Fitbit Inspire HR, which excels at the fundamentals.

It’s important to note that only a portion of the device’s front is occupied by the display. Why Fitbit chose such a thick bezel is a mystery to me. Without a doubt, this is not ideal. This implies that you can only view one stat at a time when tracking your exercise. And while this works, fiddling with the screen in the middle of a workout is not ideal. The Charge 3, for example, displays two stats at a time, making it ideal for swiftly checking your data.

The tracker can be activated and menus can be exited by pressing the single physical button on the left. The button can also be pressed to pause and restart an exercise. You may view the battery level and some settings by pressing for a long time. Swiping and tapping on the screen are used for the remaining navigation.

You must tap on the display with some of Fitbit’s older trackers, such as the Alta HR. Because it has a decent touchscreen, the Inspire HR is an improvement. It was incredibly touch-responsive, in my opinion.

Learning to navigate is not too difficult. To go through your daily stats, swipe up from the primary watch display. For the fitness app, timer, alarm, and settings, swipe down. You won’t even consider it after some practice.

For the device, you can choose from lilac, black, or white. A traditional band made of soft silicone is included right out of the box. Aluminum that has been anodised makes up the typical watch buckle. It merely takes a few seconds to switch the bands and can be done with additional bands that may be purchased separately. I ended up going with a third-party metal mesh alternative. These are reasonably priced and are available on Amazon.

Only the tracker without a heart rate monitor is compatible with a clip-on accessory. This is done to accommodate people who would have previously chosen Zip.

The Inspire HR is water-resistant like the majority of more current Fitbit gadgets. It is safe to submerge it down to a depth of 50 meters, and it will also track your swimming workouts, but with very little information.

A 3-axis accelerometer, vibration motor, and optical heart rate sensor are all located inside the tracker. This is sufficient to cover the essentials of tracking your fitness. An altimeter for counting floors is what is lacking.

Additionally, there is no built-in GPS, which is not very shocking. The only Fitbit with built-in GPS is the Ionic, but this is likely to change soon. This implies that when riding or running, you must allow Inspire HR to tag onto the GPS signal of your smartphone.

Battery life is about what you would expect from the San Francisco company. The device is advertised to have a 5-day battery life, but this is dependent on usage. The lithium polymer battery gave me no issues lasting 4 days, but anything beyond that was difficult. To be fair, I was using it a lot. The proprietary charger takes the battery from empty to full in a few hours.

Features

Inspire HR is designed for folks who only need the essentials and aren’t concerned with complex features. And it does this job admirably. It’s not a surprise given that Fitbit is best known for this.

The device tracks calories expended, steps taken, distance traveled, and active minutes. Thanks to tiny LEDs on the underside of the tracker, it will also display heart rate values. One of the most significant indicators of health and fitness is the resting heart rate in the morning.

The stats for sleep tracking are pretty thorough. They contain information on light, deep, REM, and awake time. There is no need to press any buttons in the evening because everything is carried out automatically. Additionally, the gadget will detect afternoon naps.

However, the list goes on. Let’s not overlook female health tracking and breathing exercises to keep you stress-free. For the price, this is an outstanding feature selection.

A move reminder will let you know if you haven’t walked 250 steps during your active hours. As the hour draws near, your wrist will vibrate if you are not close to the objective.

This kind of feature ought to be used more frequently by people. In the US, official physical standards have recently been modified in that they now take into account research on the value of standing more often. Regardless of the length of the day, adults are advised to move about often. Prior to this, the daily recommendations solely considered 10-minute periods of physical activity.

As previously indicated, the only sensor that is lacking when it comes to the fundamentals is an altimeter for keeping track of floors climbed. Not a deal breaker, but to certain people, it might be.

Fitbit’s blood oxygen sensor is also absent from the Inspire HR. Nobody would notice, that is. Fitbit has attached the sensor to gadgets like the Charge 3 and Versa, but hasn’t yet used it in actual operations. It is currently simply sitting there and doing nothing.

The tracker is quite straightforward to set up, and the companion smartphone app is easy to use. When you start the app, Inspire HR will instantly sync via Bluetooth once you’ve entered all of your information and synced with the tracker.

On the tracker itself, you can examine daily activity statistics, but the smartphone app is where you should go for more information, trends, and graphs. There is no lack of information. For more breakdowns, tap on pretty much any metric.Additionally, Inspire HR has more than 15 different exercise modes. Swimming is included, but the only statistics are duration and caloric expenditure. Therefore, avoid looking for more specific data like laps or distance, which can be obtained on some of Fitbit’s other devices.

Simply begin the exercise—in this case, running—and Inspire HR will start tracking immediately. By accessing the screen menus, you can also choose to begin an exercise manually. Since it will ensure that your efforts are accurately tracked, I actually advise you to make the effort to accomplish this.For individuals who often workout outside, the Connected GPS is a helpful addition. It improves the accuracy of your statistics and enables more complex performance indicators like VO2 Max and Cardio Fitness Level. The tracker does a decent job of establishing and keeping a connection with your smartphone’s satellite signal.

Important reading: Which Fitbit Inspire HR or Charge 3 is best?

The quality of the data is quite good, and the running statistics are quite detailed. The heart rate accuracy is comparable to other wrist-based trackers but not on par with chest straps. As was previously observed, the small screen size is a drawback for runners.

You will receive data on time, steps, distance, heart rate, pace, and average pace. If you had your phone with you during the run, the app will show you a map of your route afterwards.

Finally, the Inspire HR includes a few fundamental smartwatch features. To keep you connected while traveling, it also features silent alarms and notifications. You’ll be made aware of a notification by a vibration. The tracker’s display will show you the main points of the message. However, you will typically need to grab your phone to read it in its entirety.

Overview

The result

There is nothing ground-breaking about Inspire HR. Instead, it repackages Fitbit’s current technology into a more contemporary form factor, making it more widely accessible and affordable. The activity band resembles a cross between the Charge 3 and the Alta HR in several ways.

Which is better, the Fitbit Inspire HR or the Fitbit Charge 3?

As it covers the essentials without overwhelming you with information, the gadget is a fantastic choice for individuals just starting to measure their fitness. The altimeter for counting floors is the sole sensor that is lacking, but most people won’t find this to be a deal-breaker.

If you’re more dedicated to working out, Charge 3 or Versa may be better options.They have more advanced swim tracking, a somewhat longer battery life, and more smartwatch features in addition to the larger screen (which implies more on-screen info), altimeter, and other features.

Those who choose a thinner, more covert appearance will be completely satisfied. One of Fitbit’s current fitness trackers with the best value is this one.

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